Onions

Zones
Yellow Long-day, Stuttgarter-type onions that will produce medium-sized bulbs with stronger flavor and a flat shape. Excellent onion for storage and cooking. 3 – 6
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White Long-day, Ebenezer onions that will produce medium-sized bulbs with strong flavor and flat shape. Whites are one of the most popular varieties for table onions. Great also for cooking and storing. 3 – 6
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Red Long-day, Whethersfield variety that has excellent color and will produce medium-sized bulbs with strong flavor and a flat shape. A popular choice for salads and burgers. Excellent for storing and cooking. 3 – 6
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Sweets Short-day or Intermediate-day onions. We ship Granex onion sets to the southern states and Intermediate-day sweet onion sets to the rest of the states. Our intermediate variety is much like “Candy”, but stores better. 5 – 9
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Planting Instructions

How do I grow jumbo-sized onions?
1. Plant our bulbs shallow (no more than 1/2″ of soil covering the bulbs) and 4″ apart.
2. Plant according to geographic location. (see zone map)

Southern States up to Northern Georgia:
Plant short-day sweet onion bulbs in the fall. Dutch Valley Super Sweets offered in the fall are short-day Granex onions. Gardeners in this area may also plant Intermediate-day onion bulbs in the spring. Plant onions bulbs 4″ apart in the row.

Northern Georgia to the Southern Great Lakes:
Plant a Dutch Valley Super Sweet Onion Bulb in the spring (as early as you can work the soil). Gardeners in this area may also plant in the fall and cover the bulbs over winter with mulch to get a small
2 to 2 1/2″ onion in the early spring. Plant onions bulbs 4″ apart in the row.

Southern Great Lakes and North:
Plant a yellow, white or red Dutch Valley Onion Bulb for a 2 to 2 1/2″ onion or plant a Dutch Valley Super Sweet Onion Bulbs for a 3 – 5″ onion. Gardeners should plant as early as possible (frost will not hurt the bulbs). Plant onions bulbs 4″ apart in the row.

Soil Preparation:
Add manure or organic compost to the soil several weeks before planting. Soil should be tamped down firm before planting. Onions will grow in most types of soil. Onions prefer a slightly acidic soil with a pH of 5.5 – 6.5 for optimal growing. Ensure that the soil is well drained.

Garlic & Elephant Garlic

Zones
Description:
When grown properly, the common variety garlic has a robust flavor with 8 – 12 cloves and is a delicious addition to many recipes.
3 – 8
(map)

Planting Instructions:

Soil Preparation:
For ideal growing, a deep fertile, well drained soil is best. Fertilize the soil with a general garden fertilizer (5N – 10P – 10K), or an organic compost is most beneficial (well rotted). The soil’s pH should be above 6.0, ideally in the pH 6.5 – 7.0 range.

When to Plant:
In general, garlic should be planted in the autumn through early winter. In temperate areas, plant after the first good frosts of autumn. The cold of winter is necessary to form the side buds that will eventually become the cloves of the plant.

Spacing:
Choose the largest, healthiest looking cloves. Sow with root end facing down. Plant at a depth of 1 inch (25mm) below the soil surface. Plant each clove 4 inches apart. (For Elephant Garlic, plant 6 – 8 inches apart.)

Growing the Largest Best Possible Bulbs:
Dutch Valley Growers has already pre-determined the best variety for your area. Excellent drainage is key to preventing the risk of disease, fungi and keeping the roots healthy. Consider a raised bed to help with drainage. Once the plants are growing in the spring, use very light side applications of a nitrogen fertilizer about every two weeks. Garlic does not compete well with weeds, so keep you garden free of weeds. Keep garlic plants watered during dry spells in spring.

Shallots

Zones
Description:
Shallots are a member of the onion and garlic families. A gourmet’s delight, shallots add a unique depth of flavor to a recipe, without overpowering it. Unlike garlic, which is a clove that grows into a bulb, the shallot is a bulb that grows other bulbs around it.
3 – 8
(map)

Soil Preparation:

For ideal growing, a deep fertile, well drained soil is best. Fertilize the soil with a general garden fertilizer or an organic compost is most beneficial (well rotted). The soil’s pH should be ideally in the pH 5.5 – 7.0 range.

When to Plant:
In general, shallots should be planted in the autumn or early spring. In temperate areas, zones 5 or warmer, plant after the first good frosts of autumn. Winter’s freezing (Vernalization), usually results in a larger crop with better taste.

Spacing:
Choose the largest, healthiest looking bulbs. Plant the bulbs in rows with 6″ spacing.

Growing the Largest Best Possible Bulbs:
Dutch Valley Growers has already pre-determined the best variety for your area. Grow in full sun or partial shade. Excellent drainage is key to preventing the risk of disease, fungi and keeping the roots healthy. For young harvested shallots, plant at a depth of 2 inches (50mm). For larger, mature shallots, plant just beneath the soil surface. In both cases, when the stem shows growth, hill the soil around the stem as it grows. Keep shallot plants watered during dry spells in spring.

TIPS: Plant shallots in ridges about 2 feet apart. Tamp the sides of the ridges so that the soil will drain properly. Dust the ridges with wood ashes at least 2 time during the winter to discourage worms and wilt.

usda-zone-map